Territorial Survey Reveals Most Valued Areas of Ministry - Salvation Army Canada

Advertisement


Salvationist.ca | The Salvation Army in Canada and Bermuda

The Voice of The Salvation Army in Canada and Bermuda
View RSS Feed

Archives

  • Aug8Fri

    Territorial Survey Reveals Most Valued Areas of Ministry

    Results to help Army strengthen connection between behaviours and values. August 8, 2014 by Brianne Zelinsky
    Filed Under:
    Territorial News
    More than 1,100 Salvation Army officers and employees answered a core values survey in February 2014, shedding light on the values of the Army. Participants were asked to choose their top 10 personal values, and identify current and desired cultural values in The Salvation Army.

    The survey was conducted by The Salvation Army's Ethics Centre, which strives to ensure that the core values of the Army are evident in all areas of ministry. "Maintaining congruence between the Army's core values and operational culture is important," says Sharon Jones-Ryan, consultant, management and organizational ethics, because “what you do reflects your values, even if it's unintentional.”

    “This survey gives us some really rich information about what people are thinking and it gives us a glimpse at what people want the organization to look like,” Jones-Ryan explains.

     




























































    Which
    of the following values and behaviors most represent who you are?
    Which
    of the following values and behaviors most represent how your organization
    currently operates?
    Which
    of the following values and behaviors are essential for your organization to
    achieve its highest performance?
     1. Accountability 1. Community involvement 1. Accountability
     2. Compassion 2. Accountability 2. Compassion
     3. Honesty 3. Caring 3. Coaching / mentoring
     4. Caring 4. Compassion 4. Teamwork
     5. Family 5. Mission focus 5. Community involvement
     6. Commitment 6. Brand image 6. Adaptability
     7. Intimacy with God 7. Bureaucracy 7. Caring
     8. Integrity 8. Making a difference 8. Leadership development
     9. Humour / fun 9. Hierarchy 9. Intimacy with God
     10. Respect 10. Teamwork 10. Integrity

     

    Three core values appeared on all three lists: accountability, compassion and caring. Jones-Ryan notes that though people within The Salvation Army can agree on the same values, those values can look different in different contexts. “These values live differently in each of us,” she says. “Where one ministry identifies hierarchy as a positive existing value, another may see it as an impediment.”

    Intimacy with God is one core value that was identified as a desired cultural value. “My personal interpretation of this would think that people want us to own our faith and unapologetically remember that we are doing what we're doing because we're called by God to do it,” says Jones-Ryan.

    To understand the direction that The Salvation Army is moving in, the survey will be sent out and results will be analyzed annually. “These results are a snapshot in time. They are not prescriptive and they do not give a solution,” Jones-Ryan explains.

    The hope in releasing the gathered information is that the Army will gain an awareness of where its values stand and where they hold true. “This survey gives us a place to begin conversations,” she concludes. “It's important to build with these tools and continually strengthen the connection between our behaviours and values.”

    Comment

    On Friday, April 3, 2020, CPT MILFRED W.A. HARPER FIRE CHAP& RTD BLACK WATCH said:

    I BELIEVE THAT SOLDIERS SHOULD HAVE THE RIGHT TO SPEAK OUR MINDS AND NOT BECOME LABELLED TROUBLE MAKERS. WHEN OUR CORP CLOSED EVERYTHING DISAPPEARED AND WE JUST WANTED SOMETHING TO BE REMINDED OF OUR CORP. WE ALSO WONDER WHY SO MANY OFFICER LEFT THE MINISTRY, BECAUSE THEY ESTABLISH GOOD PROGRAMS AND THE SOLDIER HAS TO WRAP UP THE PROGRAMS.I HAVE BEEN IN CONTACT WITH A LOT OF OFFICERS WHO HAS LEFT THE MINISTRY AND ARE LEADING IN ANOTHER DENOMINATION . ONE CHAP WANTED TO TAKE OVER OUR CORP BUT WAS TOLD THAT HE HAD TO MOVE, AND THE ARMY WAS PUT IN THEIR PLACE, SO THEY QUIT AND I SUPPORT HIM AND HIS CHOICE.THEN THEY ENDED UP WITH A COUPLE PLAYING CHURCH.

     

    On Tuesday, August 19, 2014, Donald Jefcoat said:

    I am surprised that Intimacy with God was so low on the list.. Has the Army lost their focus on God and the need to draw close to him? In all that the Army does should be to introduce people to the love of God and how awesome it is to draw close to him.

    On Wednesday, August 13, 2014, Sam Daniel said:

    Yes I agree to that three core values appeared on all three lists: accountability, compassion and caring.

    On Tuesday, August 12, 2014, Ira Barrow said:

    About the so-called waste of money because "the General was in town": Wait as minute. The General was not merely "in town"; he was "in congress".

    While there must be wisdom in how the money is spent, an event like a congress, can be of immense value. I only wish General Arnold Brown were here to articulate and elaborate on that point, I, a poor substitute, will make one or two comments.

    Obviously, the first is the direct spiritual value. If we believe the General is God's man for this time, it is important that we hear what he has to say. Being there when he (she) said it, makes a bigger impact that hearing it on the social media or reading it. By the way, I was not at the congress.

    Some of the greatest gains I made in my spiritual life were made at various congresses, in Newfoundland, Halifax, Winnipeg,, Atlanta, and London (I was serving in England at the time). I can still recall much of what our leaders, particularly our Generals said. And when tempted, when tired, when doubtful, when perplexed, I often think back to those high-water marks in my life.

    Over the years, hundreds and hundreds of good Salvationists, have either heard the call to officership at a congress, or had it confirmed. I know this to be true from my 12 years on college staff and my 14 years reporting congresses while a member of the editorial department in Canada and England.

    So could it be that because we did not have faith to venture having a territorial congress for decades, lest we be condemned for wasting money that could be more wisely spent, be ONE of the reasons we've had fewer men and women becoming officers?

    General Brown was quick to say that congresses "do something good" for Salvationists. Since most Salvationists serve in small corps they catch a glimpse of the bigger Army. That is a healthy thing. And many young Salvationists have found a life-long partner at a congress. I could go on but you must be tired of reading by now. Forgive me,

    God bless our General!

    On Sunday, August 10, 2014, Salvationist Magazine said:

    Bob,
    You raise some important points regarding accountability and the use of finances and we appreciate your feedback; however, it is important to clarify that NO public donations are used in the funding of spiritual/church activities, internal congresses, etc. (The exception being those churches that run social services programs and this is strictly accounted for separately). ALL money raised from the public goes toward our social services efforts to help alleviate poverty. You can read more in our Annual Report at http://www.salvationarmy.ca/annualreview2012-2013/

    On Sunday, August 10, 2014, Bob said:

    I find this survey ironic that the Salvation Army surveyors indicated that accountability is a major priority overall. If it is regardless to finances than I would be incline to disagree as I see so much money wasted on events that are for internal Army folks only rather than serving the poor. For example, sending every officer to Toronto in June (flights, hotels, food, venue, etc) because the General was in town. As well, the amount of money that will be spent to send people to London, England next year must range in the millions of dollars. This money could help more individuals suffering from poverty. I am just wondering if the public really knows where donations are actually being spent.

    Leave a Comment