Poetry in a Pandemic - Salvation Army Canada

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    Poetry in a Pandemic

    Acknowledging the contributions of front-line workers. May 10, 2021 by Major Colin Bain
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    In March, The Salvation Army recognized the one-year anniversary of the World Health Organization’s declaration of a global pandemic by joining together for a territorial day of prayer. Major Colin Bain, assistant executive director, Toronto Housing and Homeless Supports, shared the following poem he wrote to acknowledge the contributions of Salvation Army personnel who serve on the front lines to share the love of Jesus.
     

    Front-line Worker

    I am a front-line worker

    Who am I?

    I am the first face of The Salvation Army

    I see the eyes of those who won’t look at mine

    I hear the words of need

    I smell the dirt and grime

    I touch the heart of those who fear

    I face the face whose need is dear

     

    I am the front-line worker

    I live in places large and small

    Far flung and near to you all

    From coast to coast to coast

    And sometimes further still

    The mission is as close as my hand

    And as far as the darkest heart

    With heart to God and hand to man

    I am the front-line worker

     

    I work on streets

    I gather food and give it, too

    I help the homeless find a place

    I listen in, with Jesus’ grace

    I help to heal in hospitals, too

    I am the front-line worker

    From Buchans to Iqaluit and Windsor in Ontario

    From Gitwinksihlkw to Toronto and Warwick in Bermuda

    I speak French in Saint Jerome, and other places, too

     

    From Meadow Lake and Winnipeg to Estevan and Moncton

    In Whitehorse and in Edmonton, you’ll find me there as well

    I’m everywhere the need is met

    I am the front-line worker

     

    I make the beds where people sleep

    The floors I clean, the meals I prepare

    The tears and noses wipe and confidences keep

    I hear the same words over, as if for the first time

    And help the harried find some sleep

    I am the front-line worker

     

    For those with addiction, I point the way

    With families with concerns, I will pray

    For seniors who need company or a roof

    For children who need protection

    I am there

    I am the front-line worker

    For those who need a shoulder to lean on

    In their home or hospice

    In prison finding freedom

    Seeking something more

    Than life’s worthless spice

    For those who need a friend

    To guide them to the end

    I am the front-line worker

     

    For diverse tasks

    Like hampers or tax

    From times like Christmas

    And all through the year

    For daily thrift within our stores

    Finding jobs or simply at home

    Any time, anywhere

    Anybody everywhere

    Who am I?

    I am a front-line worker

    I am the first face of The Salvation Army

    And I’ll face life with you

    Comment

    On Wednesday, May 19, 2021, Moges Yalew said:

    This is just a beautiful artistic description of what a frontline workers mean and it is also very inspiring to others who wanted to work in the social services sector and help the underprivileged community members of our society. Thank you for sharing Major Colin Bain.

     

    On Thursday, May 13, 2021, DeborahJesus-Joel said:

    Nice Touching Moving Heartfelt poem by Major Colin Bain...O God Arise! Now! For the oppression of the poor, for the sighing of the needy, Now You must Arise! Just as You Saith O LORD;And set us all I safety from every adversity and adversary that puffeth at us..

    Thank You our All-Profitable Master Jesus Christ, Halleluyah!!

     

    On Wednesday, May 12, 2021, Christine LeBlanc said:

    What a wonderful poem! Thank you for sharing it. Our frontline are so, so important. Keeping them all in heartfelt prayer in these challenging days.

     

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