New Staff Writer Will Help Tell Army Story - Salvation Army Canada

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    New Staff Writer Will Help Tell Army Story

    In addition to writing for Salvationist and Faith & Friends magazines, Kristin Fryer will serve as editor of Edge for Kids. February 14, 2012
    Filed Under:
    Territorial News
    The Salvation Army's editorial department welcomes Kristin Fryer as our new staff writer. Prior to completing her master's degree in philosophy and literature at the University of East Anglia, Kristin received a bachelor's degree in English from Trinity Western University. She was editor-in-chief of the Mars' Hill student newspaper at Trinity Western and publications editor at the Fraser Institute. In addition to writing for Salvationist and Faith & Friends magazines, Kristin will serve as editor of Edge for Kids. John McAlister, web producer, speaks to Kristin as she takes up her new role.

    What are your impressions of The Salvation Army?
    I have always loved the Army's slogan “Heart to God, Hand to Man.” To me, this really embodies what the Army is all about. The focus is on God first and above all, but that focus compels us to love and serve others, in practical as well as spiritual ways. The slogan is essentially a variation on Jesus' commandment to love God and love your neighbour as yourself.

    What motivated you to become a writer?
    I've always been a writer. I wrote (and illustrated!) my first short story when I was four—I still have it in a box somewhere. I read a lot and I think the two—reading and writing—often go hand-in-hand. If you enjoy reading stories, why not write your own? I especially enjoy the creative aspects of writing, whether I'm crafting an interesting story or a philosophical argument.

    What book has impacted you the most and why?
    The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky has had a huge impact on me. At its core, the book is a debate between atheism and Christianity, represented by Ivan/Smerdyakov and Father Zosima/Alyosha. Though its most famous passage is probably “The Grand Inquisitor,” a parable that addresses human nature and freedom, the whole novel is so rich. I particularly love the section where Zosima tells his life story and the epilogue where Alyosha gives his “Speech by the Stone.”

    What do you hope to accomplish as staff writer?
    I want to write articles that will tell the Army's stories, shed light on important issues and encourage people in their faith. And I hope that I will learn a lot along the way.

    Comment

    On Wednesday, February 29, 2012, Shelley Jahrig said:

    Keep up the good work all of you, you do the world a great service and we love what you're doing.

    Leave a Comment